New Articles — and an announcement

I just got back from interop, the conference for emerging technologies that connect business – from data center to cloud to switches, servers, and software. It was an incredibly busy week.  You might not have been there, but the “dessert first” part of the story is all of the articles that came out of the […]

Read More

Four Testing Strategies

I’ve spent a good deal of time lately thinking about how we frame the problem of software testing – and how we solve it. It impacts how we see the world, and how we treat each other. Over the weekend, I came up with four fundamental strategies in software testing, which I considered writing up […]

Read More

The Wikitest Framework

UPDATE: I want to do a post on the importance of limiting ambiguity and making sure you have as much meaningful consensus as possible – a counterbalance to my last post. Still, that’s going to be a whopper. I also want to respond to some of Shrini and Llya’s comments. Again, those will be be […]

Read More

100% Test Automation

A recent post I put out to the Agile-Testing List: The original poster asked:> I have been asked to work out a system to make a 100%> automated testing solution to suit the agile development> process that the dev team are using. Perhaps I don’t understand what 100% automated testing solution means. When I hear […]

Read More

Explaining Exploratory Testing

I’m a big fan of exploratory testing. I believe it can be a much more effective method of software testing than hard-coded automation or manual scripts, both of which suffer from both inattentional blindness and the minefield problem. The problem is explaining it. People seem to fall into two camps – 1) Those who believe […]

Read More

Extreme QA?

Back in 2002, James Canter and Liz Derr wrote a paper on “Extreme QA.” While I don’t agree with everything in the article, and I think their use of the term is … questionable, I do like when people are thinking, trying new things, and writing about the process. Overall, it’s an interesting article; you […]

Read More

Is it a DSL or an API?

One of the “new new” things in developer-centric testing is using Ruby to create customer acceptance tests in a unique, domain specific testing language. Chromatic takes a humorous look at “DSL”s in Ruby here.

Read More

Greased Lightning (Talks)

Lightning Talks are ten five-minutes talks in a sixty-minute slot. As a speaker, I enjoy them because they sharpen my mind. There’s no time for an introductory joke, no long agenda, no 15 minutes of “body” with 15 minutes of Q&A at the end. Nothing to hide behind. You get to make one point, make […]

Read More

Testing Philosophy II –

About every four months, Shrini Kulkarni convinces me to drop the term “Test Automation” from my vocabulary. After all, testing is a creative, thinking process. We can automate some steps of what we are doing, speeding up repetitive work – but those don’t turn out to be the investigative, critical thinking steps(*). Still, I want […]

Read More

Ruby Vs. Python for Testing

There is an interesting discussion going on on the Agile-Testing Yahoo Group right now, about the differences between Python and Ruby. It is oddly reminiscent of conversation I’ve had a dozen times recently – about the advantages of Ruby Vs. Perl. All of the old-school computer scientists are saying that there isn’t much difference, while […]

Read More

My theory of software testing – I

What’s the right mix of exploratory testing, “planned” manual testing, and test automation? My short answer is “it depends.” Now, you don’t need to point out that “it depends” is non-helpful – I realize that – and I am going to try to go beyond it. The reason I say “it depends” is that it […]

Read More