Four Testing Strategies

I’ve spent a good deal of time lately thinking about how we frame the problem of software testing – and how we solve it. It impacts how we see the world, and how we treat each other. Over the weekend, I came up with four fundamental strategies in software testing, which I considered writing up […]

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The Wikitest Framework

UPDATE: I want to do a post on the importance of limiting ambiguity and making sure you have as much meaningful consensus as possible – a counterbalance to my last post. Still, that’s going to be a whopper. I also want to respond to some of Shrini and Llya’s comments. Again, those will be be […]

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100% Test Automation

A recent post I put out to the Agile-Testing List: The original poster asked:> I have been asked to work out a system to make a 100%> automated testing solution to suit the agile development> process that the dev team are using. Perhaps I don’t understand what 100% automated testing solution means. When I hear […]

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Explaining Exploratory Testing

I’m a big fan of exploratory testing. I believe it can be a much more effective method of software testing than hard-coded automation or manual scripts, both of which suffer from both inattentional blindness and the minefield problem. The problem is explaining it. People seem to fall into two camps – 1) Those who believe […]

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Extreme QA?

Back in 2002, James Canter and Liz Derr wrote a paper on “Extreme QA.” While I don’t agree with everything in the article, and I think their use of the term is … questionable, I do like when people are thinking, trying new things, and writing about the process. Overall, it’s an interesting article; you […]

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Greased Lightning (Talks)

Lightning Talks are ten five-minutes talks in a sixty-minute slot. As a speaker, I enjoy them because they sharpen my mind. There’s no time for an introductory joke, no long agenda, no 15 minutes of “body” with 15 minutes of Q&A at the end. Nothing to hide behind. You get to make one point, make […]

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Testing Philosophy II –

About every four months, Shrini Kulkarni convinces me to drop the term “Test Automation” from my vocabulary. After all, testing is a creative, thinking process. We can automate some steps of what we are doing, speeding up repetitive work – but those don’t turn out to be the investigative, critical thinking steps(*). Still, I want […]

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Ruby Vs. Python for Testing

There is an interesting discussion going on on the Agile-Testing Yahoo Group right now, about the differences between Python and Ruby. It is oddly reminiscent of conversation I’ve had a dozen times recently – about the advantages of Ruby Vs. Perl. All of the old-school computer scientists are saying that there isn’t much difference, while […]

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My theory of software testing – I

What’s the right mix of exploratory testing, “planned” manual testing, and test automation? My short answer is “it depends.” Now, you don’t need to point out that “it depends” is non-helpful – I realize that – and I am going to try to go beyond it. The reason I say “it depends” is that it […]

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