Interview?

Software Quality Engineering recently sent me a bunch of inteview questions for a StickToolLook e-newsletter. Writing a reply was hard, as I wanted to provide real information that was worth reading, not just pontificate or repeat the same old thing. My replies are below; I’m interested in what you think. SQE: What are the benefits […]

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Context Driven

I posted this to the Software-Testing Yahoo Group yesterday, and I thought Creative Chaos Readers might enjoy this. The background is a post saying that context-driven thinking was universal, and there was no value in putting people into different boxes such as the “Analytic” (Academic, Telecom, Finite State Machines) school of testing or the “Factory” […]

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Against Systems

As a military cadet, I had a few occasions to design systems – generally point systems. For example, the number of points required to graduate from a summer encampment, or a merit/demerit system. I typically would write a page that gave guidelines and concluded with “Plus or minus (some big number) for items of exceeding […]

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The Software Concept Maturity Model (SCMM)

Here’s a gift for the holidays; a software concept maturity model to lighten your mood. Level 1 – InitialAt this point, someone has an idea. It seems to work for them, to solve the problems they have. The person actually uses the idea with some success. There are lots of ideas at level 1 right […]

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Four Schools of Software Testing

Most readers of “Creative Chaos” probably know that allthough I do all things software, my predominant focus is software testing. In fact, a few weeks back Elisabeth Hendrickson labelled my blog “Mostly Testing”, and I was vaguely annoyed that I did not make her “Mostly Agile” list … then again, seeing how my thoughts on […]

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Two Roads in a wood – III (Tone)

Brian Marick once wrong something to the effect of “Methodology design is an extension of personality.” There is a large percentage of the population to who having things be stable, predictable and repeatable are very important. They tend to be attracted to, and succeed it, larger companies with established “ground rules.” They tend to struggle […]

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Two Roads in a wood – II

“Deal or no deal?”“Is that your identity?”“Let’s play one verses one hundred!”“Is that your final answer?” These catch-phrases all come from simple, formulaic game shows. The shows are the same, every time, right down to the catch-phrases and witty banter. How many different ways are there to say “And we’ll find out, right after this […]

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Considering Conferences

I used to go to conferences to get new ideas, and my emphasis was on the “big” ones like The SD Conferences or the Open Source Conference. Thanks to the internet, the public library, and wooden speakers who just stand up and read the bullet-points, I can now get most of that value from home. […]

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Agile Shark Jumpin’ – IV

I turns out that my Collegue, Jim Brosseau has been going through some of the same issues that I have. Jim and I don’t totally agree on every issue (who does?), but he does say some things in a recent newsletter that I think are rather profound, and I’m going to provide a couple of […]

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Test or Hardware Architecture ? – I

In the 1960’s, we had the “Software Engineering Crisis”, which was essentially the problem that NATO could not develop software supply to meet demand. The solution, more-or-less, seemed to be TQM (at least, according to NATO), which had it’s pros and cons. (I think Tom DeMarco offered a more credible, economic explanation in “Why Does […]

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Two Roads in a wood …

(I’m still on haitus from the Agile Jumped the shark. More soon. While I work on it …) From a recent post I made to the agile-testing list … I see two roads diverging in a wood … On one side, we have Frederick W. Taylor, with his goal of a stable, predictable, repeatable process. […]

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I’ve not been welll …

… And will probably continue to be sick. There’s more to come on Agile Jumping the Shark, but it’ll probably later in the weak. Still, in the interim, I wanted to share this. This is from a discussion I had with Cem Kaner a few weeks ago: (Consultant X) is wrong. I’m wrong. Bach is […]

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(Sidebar: Going Meta …)

Bob Martin actually wrote this three years ago: As I said before, going meta is a good thing. However, going meta requires experimental evidence. Unfortunately the industry has latched on to the word “Agile” and has begun to use it as a prefix that means “good”. This is very unfortunate, and discerning software professionals should […]

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Shark Jumpin’ – III

I made a posst to the Agile-Testing list a few months back about AgileCMMI; I thought it was worth repeating here: >In the long run should we have ‘agile CMM’? Ok. I’m going to take a stand here. The Agile Manifesto has an explicit value system – individuals and interactions over processes and tools, customer […]

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Shark Jumpin’ – II

Ben Edwards commented yesterday that in TV Shows, the characters age and the writers need to introduce new characters or plotlines to keep things interesting. Those things may make the show jump the Shark, argues Ben, but Agile has “just been around for a while and is gaining followers ad people, tired of the old […]

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Agile Jumped the Shark? – I

On Happy Days, there was an episode where Fonzie jumped a shark tank on his motorcycle. Many people consider that the “high water” mark of the show, and believed that once the show reached that pinnacle, it had no where to go but down. There is even a website, JumpTheShark.com, devoted to chronicalling when TV […]

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If you hate it, do more of it

I was talking to Tessa yesterday about the PMP certification, which I am not exactly a big fan of. She reminded me of the old adage ‘if you hate it, do more of it.’ In other words, if you have windows, learn dotNet. If you hate this Ruby/RailsNation thing, give it a try. If testing […]

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Coding Standards ?

This month’s Software Quality Professional claims on page 51 that: By having defined coding standards, developers trained in the use of the those standards are less likely to make certain coding errors. The one thing coding standards guarentee is consistency, and, arguably, readability. But less errors? I grant that in theory, coding standards can prevent […]

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