Against Systems – II

I’ve been complaining that people like defined systems – even when they stink – because they are easy. In fact, many people don’t even see the idea of craft in software testing, are completely oblivous to it, and view software testing as some clerical role, like counting inventory in a grocery store. So, what I’m […]

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Measuring Project Health

I’ve been known to say that explaining a single idea so well that it can’t be misunderstood takes me about 1,000 words. Well, yesterday, on the context-driven testing yahoo group, someone asked for sample software metrics, and, short on time, I quipped off a quick three or four sentence reply. And, of course, I wrote […]

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Craft Appreciation

An article on Art Appreciation that is really about Craft Appreciation and skill building – from From Paul Graham: What counts as a trick? Roughly, it’s something done with contempt for the audience. For example, the guys designing Ferraris in the 1950s were probably designing cars that they themselves admired. Whereas I suspect over at […]

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The Age of Reason

I just finished reading Measuring The World which is a wonderful historic novel about the world in the 18th and early 19th century. In many ways, the book explores the death of the Greek mythology and folklore and the beginning of science. Aristotle’s earth/air/water/fire theory is replaced by the periodic table of the elements, Carl […]

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Certifiable – II

Another post, this one to the agile-management list … Ron Jeffries Wrote:A leadership certification, one would imagine, would perforce be far less specific and far more general, but just as likely to be interpreted as indicating that the certificate holder is qualified, surely more qualified than her colleagues around her who do not hold the […]

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Certifiable?

The Agile Project Leadership Network is working on a certificate program in Agile Leadership. This has been discussed a bit on the Agile Leadership Yahoo group. I just emailed a reply and thought I would share it here .. Ron “The Don” Jeffries Wrote:>But rightly so. My lack of comments on the topic should be […]

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Interesting Presentation

Elisabeth Hendrickson just put up a reminder of her 2002 talk “Why Are My Pants On Fire?” – It is a quick but interesting read – here. Please, go read the talk, then come back. I’ve got some spoilers, and I want you to develop your own opinion of the talk before I share them. […]

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Decline and Fall – III

I like the way my colleague, Sean, summed it up yesterday. To paraphrase what he said: Asking “Ok, but how will the decline and fall help me test this web-based app?” is probably the wrong question. It might not help you develop test cases or scenarios. What it will do is help you figure out […]

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Requirements Methodology

If you listen to James Bach enough, you will eventually hear the idea that every practitioner should be able to articulate his strategy and methodology – preferably quickly – and defend it’s reasoning. Bach is generally talking about testing, but I’d like to talk about my philosophy on requirements for a bit. Now, I view […]

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Run Corporate IT like a software company

I’m still on vacation, but this struck my eye as worth sharing … … corporate IT has to find ways to deliver the most important business capabilities as quickly as possible and as cheaply as possible. When the rubber hits the road, this capability is the only one that matters. Your business partners won’t ask […]

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Off to vacate

I’ll be in vacation for the next few days, but in the mean time, Paul Carvalho has an interesting post comparing skilled (exploratory) testing to fencing. I thought it was insightful; I hope you enjoy it.

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Interview?

Software Quality Engineering recently sent me a bunch of inteview questions for a StickToolLook e-newsletter. Writing a reply was hard, as I wanted to provide real information that was worth reading, not just pontificate or repeat the same old thing. My replies are below; I’m interested in what you think. SQE: What are the benefits […]

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Context Driven

I posted this to the Software-Testing Yahoo Group yesterday, and I thought Creative Chaos Readers might enjoy this. The background is a post saying that context-driven thinking was universal, and there was no value in putting people into different boxes such as the “Analytic” (Academic, Telecom, Finite State Machines) school of testing or the “Factory” […]

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Against Systems

As a military cadet, I had a few occasions to design systems – generally point systems. For example, the number of points required to graduate from a summer encampment, or a merit/demerit system. I typically would write a page that gave guidelines and concluded with “Plus or minus (some big number) for items of exceeding […]

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The Software Concept Maturity Model (SCMM)

Here’s a gift for the holidays; a software concept maturity model to lighten your mood. Level 1 – InitialAt this point, someone has an idea. It seems to work for them, to solve the problems they have. The person actually uses the idea with some success. There are lots of ideas at level 1 right […]

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Four Schools of Software Testing

Most readers of “Creative Chaos” probably know that allthough I do all things software, my predominant focus is software testing. In fact, a few weeks back Elisabeth Hendrickson labelled my blog “Mostly Testing”, and I was vaguely annoyed that I did not make her “Mostly Agile” list … then again, seeing how my thoughts on […]

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Two Roads in a wood – III (Tone)

Brian Marick once wrong something to the effect of “Methodology design is an extension of personality.” There is a large percentage of the population to who having things be stable, predictable and repeatable are very important. They tend to be attracted to, and succeed it, larger companies with established “ground rules.” They tend to struggle […]

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